Building A DIY Aquaponics System

Written By: Thatcher Michelsen June 27, 2013 0
We've assembled some links to instructions on how to build your own DIY aquaponics garden.

Photo courtesy of Dezsery.
We've assembled some links to instructions on how to build your own DIY aquaponics garden. Photo courtesy of Dezsery.

We recently wrote about aquaponics, a relatively new system of raising agriculture and fish simultaneously that less resource intensive than traditional methods of home gardening. Some may see the process as quaint but difficult to pull off in a home setting. But the fact is that there are a number of do-it-yourself solutions that will allow you to create an aquaponics system in your house or patio, giving you a supply of both fresh vegetables and herbs as well as seafood. Based on how much free space you have and whether you're a vegetarian or eat fish, you can develop a self-contained apparatus that will have all of your green living friends jealous.

We've assembled links to some of the best DIY aqauponics setups that will get you on the road toward a more responsible food supply:

  • At TheUrbanFarmingGuys.com, a sustainable farming site, there are instructions for building a system that uses solar energy to power the water pump that hydrates whatever plants you are growing. This is quite a big setup that utilizes a 275-gallon container, so it's best for people who have some space to spare.
  • Sustainablog.org, a similar organic and sustainable living site, compiled a list of five systems that take up less space, though you may be limited in what kind fish you can raise.
  • The DIY aquaponics setup described in this video at FastCompanies.com, builder Rob Torcellini incorporated a greenhouse and raises koi and golfish in his water tank. He spent on $700 constructing it.

Hopefully, by combining elements of various aquaponics systems you can create one that fits your space and dietary needs exactly.

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