New breed of monster trucks set to crush both cars and dependence on fossil fuels

Written By: Thatcher Michelsen November 12, 2012 0
The monster truck industry could become more energy efficient, following developments by the company behind the celebrated Bigfoot vehicle.
The monster truck industry could become more energy efficient, following developments by the company behind the celebrated Bigfoot vehicle.

When people think of monster truck rallies, they imagine huge trucks trashing junk cars, and, presumably, burning through an astronomical amount of fuel in the process. A recent development, however, could change the face of this beloved American pastime and bring it into the 21st century of clean-sourced energy.

According to Bigfoot 4×4, the maker of the eponymous monster truck, a new version known simply as Number 20 will employ a state-of-the-art battery that will allow it to run entirely on electric power. The product, known as the ODYSSEY battery, was created by electricity storage group EnerSys, and the new Bigfoot truck will employ 36 of the energy-efficient battery.

In its press release, Bigfoot 4×4 stated that the new vehicle was the latest result of a nearly 20-year partnership between the two companies. Speaking about the new development, Jim Kramer, the truck maker's vice president of technology researchers, called it "part of our efforts to keep up with ever-changing technology."

He went on to concede that, despite the obvious dissatisfaction with fans the move would surely cause, the Number 20 will remain on the sidelines as they perfect the new power system and the supporting frame they designed for the new Bigfoot. However, he noted that with more work, the truck could become more energy efficient as the company's engineers fine-tune the existing system, but monster truck lovers could see it in action sometime next year.

While these developments will probably have a negligible impact on consumer automobile manufacturers' efforts to create more efficient cars, the innovations could result in larger vehicles that consume less power. For now, however, we will have to settle for dirt-cheap monster truck shows that are just a bit more friendly to the environment.

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