Turning non-recyclable industrial scraps into fuel

Written By: Thatcher Michelsen March 12, 2012 0
Weber Packaging found a way to avoid throwing out label scraps by turning them into a fuel source.
Weber Packaging found a way to avoid throwing out label scraps by turning them into a fuel source.

Companies have been making initiatives to reduce the negative impact they have on the environment for quite some time now, but the ways they are doing it have become more and more innovative as going green becomes increasingly popular.

Factories are notorious for wasting enormous amounts of material each day, and while recycling is an obvious solution, some materials simply can't be broken down and reused. That was the problem that Weber Packaging Solutions faced with the scraps produced by its label-making machines.

The paper the company uses to make its pressure-sensitive labels couldn't be reprocessed by traditional methods. Since the business's Illinois facility creates more than 1,500 tons of paper and synthetic waste each year, its leadership wanted to find a better solution for disposing these scraps than piling it into a landfill, according to Packaging Digest.

"Like a lot of companies, we're looking at ways to become a better corporate citizen by reducing our carbon footprint," John O'Leary, Weber's vice president of manufacturing told the source. "With all the new waste-handling options that are available today, it's often possible to repurpose scrap and save on disposal costs at the same time."

In order to make that vision a reality, Weber facilities manager Matt Zoost found Pellet America, a Wisconsin-based company that takes non-disposable industrial scraps and turns them in fuel pellets. Zoost told the website that Weber is expected to avoid wasting 99 percent of its annual scraps by sending them to Pellet America.

Since the recycling organization is so far away, Weber found a transport company that can tightly compact large amounts of paper waste into its trucks so that the shipments are infrequent and efficient.

While all of this is environmentally friendly, Zoost added that his company also expects to reduce its waste disposal costs by almost 20 percent.

Leave A Response »